Academics: Environmental Studies Courses

This is a small sampling of the courses offered in Environmental Studies. More courses can be found on the online campus catalog. Course Websites and Syllabi can be found by clicking on the titles below or going to the Environmental Studies website.

Introduction to Environmental Studies (ENV S 1)

Freudenburg.

“Environmental Studies” requires insights from many disciplines, including the social as well as biophysical science and the humanities. This introduction offers an overview of the field, examining both our planet and the ways in which we humans depend on it.

Introduction to Environmental Studies (ENV S 1)

Manalis; Keller. Not open for credit to students who have completed Environmental Studies 12.

Provides integration of fundamental science with environmental topics. Includes impacts of human population increase; principles of systems and change, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystems and global climate; energy and laws of thermodynamics; water supply and pollution; toxicology and risk analysis; air pollution and stratospheric ozone depletion.

Introduction to Environmental Studies (ENV S 1)

Graves. Not open for credit to students who have completed Environmental Studies 11.

An introduction to the relationship of societies and the environment from prehistorical times to the present. The course is global in perspective, and includes history, literature, philosophy, economics, science, and culture as evidence for examining the human social environment.

Introduction to Environmental Studies (ENV S 1)

Manalis. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing. Environmental Studies 1, 2, and 3.

How solar and renewable energy fits with environmental-energy options in both developed and developing nations. Technologies are studied in terms oftheir effects on the physical, social, and biological environment. Demonstrations, field trips, and guest lecturers.

Disease and the Environment (ENV S 110)

Guerrini. Prerequisites: Environmental Studies 1 or 3.

The interaction of human and animal disease and the environment through case studies, from the Black Death of 1300s to asthma, AIDS and the Ebola virus. “Environment” is broadly defined to include both natural and built environments.


Introduction to Environmental Studies (ENV S 1)

Manalis. Prerequisites: Environmental Studies 2; and, Enviromental Studies 25 or Mathematics 3A or 34A or Chemistry 1A.

Focus on learning how to use energy efficiently in accordance with the laws of thermodynamics and in harmony with the environment. Topics include the nature of energy and the fundamentals for a sustainable environmental energy policy.

Principles of Environmental Law (ENV S 125A)

Staff. Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3; and upper-division standing.

An introduction to the history and methodology of law as it relates to human use of the environment. Case studies are used to examine common law, constitutional and modern environmental laws, with an emphasis on current theories and principles.

Land Use and Planning Law (ENV S 125B)

Staff. Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 125A or 135A.

An examination of local, state, and federal laws regulating land use and development. Selected problems analyzed through case studies.

Coupled Human and Natural Systems: Risks, Vulnerability, Resilience, and Disasters (ENV S 130A)

Stonich. Prerequisites: Anthropology 2 or Environmental Studies 1 or 3. Same course as Anthropology 130A.

Examines human dimensions of global environmental change in developing countries from an interdisciplinary social science perspective. Compares and contrasts alternative conceptual and analytical models of dynamic, interrelated human-environmental systems and presents recent approaches to understanding risk, vulnerability, resilience, and disasters.

Global Tourism and Environmental Conservation (ENV S 130B)

Stonich. Prerequisites: Anthropology 2 or Environmental Studies 1 or 3. Environmental Studies 130A or Anthropology 130A. Same course as Anthropology 130B.

Focus on the contradictions between international tourism as an economic development strategy and environmental conservation efforts, especially in an era of climate change. One major objective is to help students make more informed decisions about their own tourist experiences.

Global Food Systems and Human Food Security (ENV S 130C)

Stonich Prerequisites: Anthropology 2 or Environmental Studies 1 or 3. Environmental Studies 130A or 130B or Anthropology 130A or 130B. Same course as Anthropology 130C.

Examines history of global food system and its impacts on ecosystems, ecologies, and human nutrition and food security. How agricultural, capture fisheries, and aquacultural industries were integrated into the global food system. Provides information to make more informed decisions about consuming these products.

Human Behavior and Global Environment (ENV S 132)

Staff.

Study of global environmental impacts of major human technological innovations, including the use of fire, development of agricultural tools, and the process of industrialization. Evaluation of prospects for altering human behavior to encourage sustainable development is included.

World Agriculture, Food, and Population (ENV S 149)

Cleveland. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing. Same course as Anthropology 149 and Geography 161.

Evolution, current status, and alternative futures of agriculture, food and population worldwide. Achieving environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable food systems; soil, water, crops, energy and labor; diversity, stability and ecosystems management; farmer and scientist knowledge and collaboration; common property management.

Course Website

Land Use and Planning Law (ENV S 125B)

Kryder. Prerequisites: Environmental Studies 1 or 3 and Writing 2. Not open for credit to students who have completed Environmental Studies 193EL.

Assesses contributions of literary texts to american environmental movements. Examines influences of writers such as Thoreau, Rachel Carson, and Edward Abbey upon environmental perceptions, values, and attitudes in american cultural history and upon rhetorics and politics of contemporary environmental debates.

Land Use and Planning Law (ENV S 125B)

Staff. Same course as History 173T.

Traces the history of American attitudes and behavior toward nature. Focus on wilderness, the conservation movement, and modern forms of environmentalism.

Land Use and Planning Law (ENV S 125B)

Staff. Prerequisite: Economics 1 or 2 or 109.

Introductory course on economic analysis of environmental policy. Topics include incentives and regulation, protection of the stratospheric ozone layer, global climate change, and equity issues.

Land Use and Planning Law (ENV S 125B)

Kolstad. Prerequisite: Economics 100B or 104B. Same course as Economics 115.

Course provides a rigorous treatment of environmental economics. topics include welfare analysis, ethical dimensions of economic criteria for protecting the environment, measuring the demand for environmental goods, property rights, economic incentives, including marketable permits and emission fees, and regulating risk.

Course Website

Land Use and Planning Law (ENV S 125B)Land Use and Planning Law (ENV S 125B)

Staff. Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3.

Examines water supply and use, the science of water systems and watersheds, key concepts in water policy, and the basics of water law as a fundamental element of the history and context for water policy in the West.

Advanced Study of Water Policy (ENV S 176B)

Staff. Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 176A.

Students are in the field full-time for approximately two weeks to study watersheds and water systems including Yosemite/Hetch Hetchy, Mono Lake, and the state and federal water systems in California.